TV Reviews

Homeland Season 7 Episode 2: Rebel Rebel Review

If you would like to read my review of the last episode, click here.

Synopsis: Carrie makes a discovery. Wellington protects Keane. O’Keefe continues to broadcast. (IMDB)

Writers: Patrick Harbinson and Chip Johannessen

Director: Lesli Linka Glatter

Rating: TV-MA

Running Time: 59mins

Now this is more like it. Things are definitely moving forward here and it’s nice to see Carrie take a more proactive role in this episode.

This episode started with O’Keefe continuing to broadcast in what appeared to be a basement of a home in the country. He still has plenty of followers who were willing to harbor him while on the run from the law.

It appears that Keane may not have had anything to do with McClendon’s death. O’Keefe suggested that Wellington may have been involved due to his connection to the prison guard who tended to him but Keane did not believe it. She also didn’t believe that a seemingly healthy man would simply drop dead. She tasked some advisers to look into it so we’ll see what happens there.

Wellington believe that they should change the message so he pushed his idea to release Saul and the 200 other people who were part of the administration’s second wave of arrests. Saul still had some questions and its timing but Wellington reassured him enough to accept the new position of National Security Advisor to Keane. He then confirmed his loyalty to Keane before making a speech at a press conference.

Saul’s first duty was to apprehend O’Keefe so he first went to his last known location and was greeted by some unruly people outside. Using his special powers, he was able to appeal to one of the police officers who helped him escape and get him to reveal where they took O’Keefe. In exchange, Saul would go and get O’Keefe himself.

Keane and Wellington then threatened Paley to end his investigation otherwise they’d make sure he lose his Senate seat in the upcoming election. Paley was convinced that Keane wouldn’t be in the same position by that time either.

Carrie visited her therapist who was voicing the same concerns as her sister. She believed that Carrie’s behavior may have been brought on from Quinn’s death. Carrie defended her position to her therapist but she revealed that her medication may no longer be effective. She saw Saul’s speech on TV and was surprised to say the least. While watching Wellington, she saw a mystery woman (Sandrine Holt). Asking the internet for help got her computer ransomwared. She obviously couldn’t pay the ransom so the troll responsible threatened to publish her hard drive contents online.

Carrie tried to explain herself to the troll but when that didn’t work, she tried to use her feminine charms in order to persuade him to meet her in person. It got tense as she followed his directions to their eventual meeting place. Of course by the time we see this troll, he’s just some scrawny man (Jordan Woods-Robinson) for whom she gets the upper hand on. It was definitely satisfying to see her take out her frustrations on him for having defiled her so to speak. She let him know to not mess with her before he unlocked her computer.

Overall, this was a good episode that sort of helped to give the season a direction with Keane trying to move forward although she hasn’t really changed that much and the stigma of what happened will still be there though at least she has Saul on her side (or at least that’s what he wants her to think). Carrie may be unhinged again but it was satisfying to see her take down the troll. What will she get herself into next seeing that the prisoners she was working so hard to release are now free? There are still a few questions that remain with the mystery woman and who was really responsible for McClendon’s death. I’m just looking forward to the meeting between Saul and O’Keefe.

Score: 8.5/10

If you liked this, please read my other reviews here and don’t forget to follow me on Twitter, follow me on Instagram, and also like me on Facebook.

Advertisements

Categories: TV Reviews

Tagged as: ,

2 replies »